Fair Luxury Jewellers Survey

The Fair Luxury Jewellers Survey

Calling all jewellers, retailers and manufacturers – Fair Luxury needs your help!

One of our aims is to encourage and support jewellers to work with responsibly sourced materials, but we are well aware that this brings challenges, especially with gold availability and selection.

To facilitate, we have developed a Jewellers’ Survey to open up a discussion between jewellers and suppliers. It aims to gather information on the current and potential demand for responsibly sourced and traded gold (bullion, findings and chain). The survey also looks to see if our community (that’s you!) can come together to purchase ‘minimum order’ quantities required by dealers and suppliers, which are often beyond the reach of small independent makers.

With a little preparation, the survey takes less than 10 minutes to complete. To create a realistic picture, we kindly ask that you look at your current gold consumption (type and volume). For this you will need:

  • An idea of your annual gold use in grams (e.g., average over the past 2-3 years)
  • An idea of the percentage of gold you use by carat, colour and source (recycled/FT/FM/SMO/uncertified).

If that looks a bit daunting, here is an example to help figure it out:
Think of how many rings/earrings/etc you make in a year and their approximate weight. Then multiply by rough quantity – easy! 

It is not an audit – approximate figures are fine!

We appreciate it is a little work, but this information will help create a strong picture of demand to present to the manufacturers. All data will be collated and anonymised.

The survey will be open until 30 September 2021.

or follow the link to take part: https://www.fairluxury.co.uk/goldsurvey2021/

Please share as widely as you can – the more information we gather, the more influential it can be!

Thank you in advance!

Take the Fair Luxury Pledge

Take the Fair Luxury Pledge

Jewellery is bought, displayed and passed on as a token of love, a reflection of our personalities or as means of communicating power and wealth. Though beautiful and sparkly on the surface, sadly jewellery is often tarnished by its journey into fruition, via supply chains that harbour social injustice and perpetuate environmental destruction.

We know that when jewellery is produced responsibly it can provide sustainable livelihoods for all involved – from the miners of raw materials right through the supply chain to the ultimate designer or retailer of the finished piece.

As individual designers, makers, traders and educators we’ve pledged to make changes and business decisions that are driven by more than just profit. In every aspect of our work we seek to ensure that we are achieving and maintaining a safe, sustainable and just industry for all. We dream of one day casting our minds back and feeling proud to place ourselves at the core of the revolution that transformed the jewellery trade for good.

We are each at a different stage in our journey towards responsible business, but we are all working on it. No matter how big or small, our collective actions will change the world. Will you join the movement?

Through the jewellery we create and the ways we run our businesses, those who make the Fair Luxury Pledge each promise to:

Conserve and restore the environment
Work in a way that is responsible, transparent and accountable
Play a role in educating and empowering others

Now, it’s your turn. Wondering how to take it from here? It’s simple:

  1. Write down your plan of action. Which tangible steps will you take this year? Big or small, your measures should aim towards reducing collective impact on the environment, supporting the people that you connect with and creating a more equitable world for all.
    You could start by vowing simply to ensure that all your office waste is recycled responsibly, or take the plunge and commit to only sourcing artisanal and small-scale gold from now on. For some tips and ideas check out our posts here or go to the Ethical Making Resource.
  2. Share your plan with us by clicking the “take the pledge” button and completing our Pledge form.
  3. We’ll send you a link to the Fair Luxury Pledge badge to share with your website visitors and social media followers.
    If you have time, why not create a page on your website dedicated to explaining your pledge?
  4. Encourage a jewellery friend to join the movement.
  5. Sign up to our mailing list and keep an eye out for email updates about our webinars and events!

With your permission we’d love to share details of your pledge on social media and, along with the wider Fair Luxury community, to support and encourage you on your journey.

Impacts of COVID-19 on ASM

Impacts of COVID-19 on ASM

The COVID-19 pandemic has had significant detrimental impacts on the artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) sector worldwide. It has caused supply chain disruptions that have impacted large – and small-scale mineral sectors alike, and has resulted in a drop in both production and income for huge numbers of artisanal miners, many of whom do not have the capital to be resilient against such shocks.

Against this backdrop, and knowing the importance of reliable data for understanding the challenges that faced artisanal miners, Levin Sources participated in a study looking at the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM). As part of the World Bank-funded Delve Impact Reporting Initiative, we conducted interviews from May – July 2020 with both artisanal miners and key sector stakeholders in the DRC, Mozambique, Uganda and Zimbabwe. With a focus on gold and construction minerals, data was collected from miners every two weeks over a ten-week period, in order to understand how the impacts of the pandemic were changing for miners over time. Approximately thirty to forty mine site respondents were interviewed by telephone in each country, using a remote survey designed by Delve. Data was collected on a number of key topics, including health and safety (related to COVID-19), gender issues, physical security, food security, government support and engagement and how miner’s production, markets and supply chains were impacted by the pandemic and related restrictions.

Our key findings have been documented in a series of blogs, showcasing our results in each country, as well as a special edition on the gendered impacts of COVID – how the pandemic has impacted women artisanal miners in particular.

View the blogs created by Levin Sources staff and our in country associates.

https://www.levinsources.com/knowledge-centre/insights/asm-covid-19-government-response

https://www.levinsources.com/knowledge-centre/insights/impacts-covid-19-asm-mozambique

https://www.levinsources.com/knowledge-centre/insights/covid-19-impacts-artisanal-gold-mining-zimbabwe

https://www.levinsources.com/knowledge-centre/insights/covid-19-communaut%C3%A9s-mineurs-artisanaux-rdc

https://www.levinsources.com/knowledge-centre/insights/impacts-covid-19-women-asm

https://www.levinsources.com/knowledge-centre/insights/covid-19-impacts-asm-uganda-policy-recommendations

Jane Barnett, December 2020

Open House: Diamonds – What’s Next?

The fifth Open House concludes our series on diamonds with a real­‑life look at diamond mining, human rights and the environment.

Join us on Friday 27 November 3pm (GMT)

Book your place here.

We’ll be addressing some difficult questions and challenges:

What the Kimberley Process is and what it isn’t. Flaws and potential solutions.

What it is really like on the ground; what would improve the situation? What if everyone just bought lab grown diamonds?

Our own Clara Breen and David Crump will host with guest speakers who have experience in African diamond mining and have conducted independent research in the field. Their short presentations will be followed by small group discussions, a chance to reflect and connect with others on what you’ve heard and learned.

Guest Speakers

Shamiso Mtisi         Deputy Director at the Zimbabwe Environmental Law Association and
                              Kimberley Process Civil Society Coalition Coordinator

Hans Merket           Researcher, International Peace Information Service (IPIS Research)

Chie Murakami        Founder & Director General, NGO Diamonds for Peace

find out more and register

This session will round up the Fair Luxury Open House series on diamonds and their impact on people and planet. We’ve looked at natural diamonds and mining, explored developments and challenges in the lab-grown diamond industry and faced up to some of the challenges and changes in the industry, including a hard look at the Kimberley Process. Together we are developing our understanding of the ethics of this most fascinating of gemstones and finding out about the diamond industry in relation to the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. You can find out more about the UNSDGs here.

Get together with the ethical jewellery community and find support on your fair jewellery journey. Established designers, makers, new graduates and independent businesses – whatever stage of the ethical sourcing journey you’re at, you are very welcome.

If you enjoy regular updates from Fair Luxury, sign up to hear about or events and activities, follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.
Just click the social buttons at the top of the page.

Fashion Gets Active!

Those of us with long standing commitment to ethical sourcing have been working towards creating greater public awareness of the somewhat murkier challenges faced by the jewellery industry for some time now. It is often a difficult message to convey to an audience previously unaware that such issues exist and a tricky subject to broach with those only wishing to feel joy and hope for their own future with the purchase of that special ring.

How can something so representative of love be tainted by the struggles of those in the supply chain that created it?

Fifteen years ago, Hollywood focused public attention on the atrocities committed in the sourcing of what had become known as a ‘Blood Diamond’ with its release of a film of that name. However, since then wider public awareness has somewhat plateaued. Have we simply assumed that because there has been a film about it the issues highlighted have somehow been resolved?

We in the privileged western world are continuing to realise the power we hold as consumers but that can be overwhelming. Can we find ourselves dampened by a feeling of eco overload when everything that we choose to spend our money on seems to have some negative impact on our precious planet somewhere down the line?

Independent jewellers have long been conscientiously sharing their own best practice with their individual client bases and the number of such jewellers committed to ethical practice has grown exponentially over recent years – but it has still been a story that’s fermenting rather than exploding. Reaching a wider audience takes a louder voice.

And so, to see an entire feature in September’s edition of British Vogue dedicated to ethical sourcing and transparency in the supply chain does feel like a pretty substantial bump up the ladder.

The global fashion behemoth has again put itself one step ahead of what its readership wants before they knew they want it and dedicated a glossy 4-page spread – dripping with gorgeous jewels – to discuss, in user friendly terms, the complexities of today’s jewellery industry.

In an edition dedicated entirely to defining what modern activism looks like, Vogue UK’s Jewellery and Watch Director Rachel Garrahan digs into the many challenges facing the jewellery industry supply chain but also celebrates its many achievements.

Gold Spiral Earrings, Ute Decker

‘Now more than ever, jewellers are committing to responsible sourcing via supply chains as lucid as the gems themselves’ she writes. ‘In a global jewellery industry estimated to be worth £230 billion, there is a growing demand among consumers to be able to make ethically sound choices’

The article features sound bites from numerous long committed jewellers alongside a dazzling display of the precious creations themselves – such as those of Fair Luxury friend and co-conspirator Ute Decker. In addition to the glossy images it is also pleasing to see a number of the development initiatives and supply chain trailblazers gain recognition – including our very own, ever glamorous and fashion forward Stuart Pool of Nineteen48!

In the long game towards creating a more transparent and responsible business practice this is an encouraging indication of what can be achieved with greater consumer awareness. The continued commitment of those working in all sectors of our industry combined with our shared collaborative passion means that we can enjoy, with growing confidence, a sense that we are moving towards something that can sincerely be defined as Fair Luxury.

Anna Loucah, September 2020

Gold Supply Chains in the Time of Pandemic

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523290663194{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”732″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1590423695935{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]The Jewelry Industry Summit and Initiatives in Art and Culture partnered to host a webinar as part of their Fast Forwarding Sustainability series.

Uniting industry experts, this webinar covered pressing concerns for gold supply chains, the impacts of the COVID crisis on artisanal mining communities and potential solutions for responsible gold supply chains. The content and ideas shared led to some new and important thinking about the transformed world we now must confront.

Delegates were
Joanne Lebert  Executive Director, IMPACT
Conny Havel, Head of Supply Chains and Markets, Alliance for Responsible Mining (ARM)
Aimee Boulanger, Executive Director, Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance (IRMA)
Estelle Levin-Nally, Founder + Director, Levin Sources
Christina T. Miller, Founder + Lead Consultant, Christina T. Miller Sustainable Jewelry Consulting

For those who missed this informative and powerful session we recommend it and you can find it on their webinars page here – or use this link
https://www.jewelryindustrysummit.com/webinars/[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Making Change

Make change by changing the way you make.

POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE – we’ll update you as soon as new details are announced.

The Incorporation of Goldsmiths 4th Ethical Making Symposium, Change Making will focus on how, through innovative design strategies and alternative sourcing methods, jewellers and makers can design out waste, source ethically and create better brands to make for change.

Innovative and thoughtful design and material choice are the cornerstones of ethical making and making to create positive change. Design is where new ideas are born, with the potential to disrupt damaging patterns and enact real change. Material choice can account for up to 95% of a product’s social and environmental impact. Choosing materials that are responsibly sourced, that reduce waste and promote social welfare is critical in the process of making for change. Combining this with innovative design transforms how and why we make, creating a better future of making.

The 2020 Change Making Symposium is open to students, makers and industry professionals and will be hosted by the Glasgow School of Art (GSA) in partnership with GSA Sustainability. The symposium talks will address Scotland’s design culture and legacy of ethical making, what sustainable materials are and how they can make positive change, and circular economy design principles.

Tickets can be purchased once the new date is announced.

Speakers and suppliers will include:

  • Dr Stacey Hunter, Design Curator and Producer
  • Kira Kampmann, Marc’Harit Pearls
  • Mary Michel, Ostrero, Circular Economy Research
  • Maira Toledo Rodrigues, Gemstones Brazil
  • Stuart Pool, Nineteen48 Gemstones
  • Betts Metals
  • Fairtrade
  • Fairmined

And more to be announced!

After a morning of engaging talks from makers, suppliers and researchers, there will be an ethical supplier fair in the afternoon for attendees to talk to suppliers and learn more about ethically sourced materials, followed by a drinks reception.

We will then be screening The Shadow of Gold, a new documentary examining the global gold trade, the second screening as part of the film’s UK premiere followed by a Q&A session.

Attendees may also register for a workshop in the afternoon (tickets are first come first serve and sold separately).
Scotland-based maker Jo Pudelko will be leading a practical jewellery workshop in which attendees will be reconstructing pre-owned jewellery into new pieces.

The Incorporation of Goldsmiths is committed to helping makers on their journey towards ethical making and do this through their annual Symposiums, a range of grants, the Ethical Making Resource and the Ethical Making Pledge with the Scottish Art Colleges. The Ethical Making Resource has been created by the Incorporation of Goldsmiths of the City of Edinburgh, which trades as the Edinburgh Assay Office, and is Scotland’s oldest consumer protection group. They have hundreds of years of experience in third-party, independent assessment and are now applying that experience to one of the most important issues in the industry today: making ethically and sustainably in a global world.

For more updates on the symposium and the Incorporation of Goldsmiths, follow @incorporationofgoldsmiths on Instagram and subscribe to their newsletter at www.incorporationofgoldsmiths.org. Head to www.ethicalmaking.org to learn more about the Ethical Making Resource.

Fairmined Europe Meeting

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523290663194{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”723″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1586903235645{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]The Fairmined Meeting in Munich, February 2020, brought European jewellers and refiners together with Conny Havel and Natalia Uribe Martínez from the Alliance for Responsible Mining. It was an opportunity to hear Fairmined news and updates, celebrate 15 years of the Alliance for Responsible Mining, make new contacts and explore how ARM can better support and meet the needs of all the people and organisations it is involved with. This included the news that Fairmined gold plating is coming on-stream – you may have seen the announcement that D&M are offering this in the UK.

 

For the first time there was a Fairmined presence at the Inhorgenta jewellery fair, alongside the campaign for Mercury Free Mining and a programme of talks focusing on sustainability.

You can download a synopsis of the updates here and read more in the Fairmined blog about their Europe events here.

 

See also below links to some inspiring and informative films about the work of ARM

 

ARM celebrates it’s 15th Anniversary

ARM 15 years

Fairmined: a path to a better future   a great way to show your clients why Fairmined Gold is Gold to be Proud Of

and two movies that really show the difference Fairmined certification makes to communities.

Transforming mining communities

MACDESA: Creating a future for everyone[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

The Diamonds of Botswana

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523290663194{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”687″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” onclick=”custom_link” css=”.vc_custom_1582222625880{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}” link=”https://www.fairluxury.co.uk/featured/ethicalmakingresource/”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]The Diamonds of Botswana is the latest in the Fashionscapes series of documentaries from Eco-Age that explores aspects of the global fashion supply chain. Directed by Andrew Morgan it follows Livia Firth as she discovers the diamond industry in Botswana and how an industry with a questionable history can transform and create positive impact.

 

The Shadow of Gold

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Join us for an online screening of

The Shadow of Gold

In partnership with
The Goldsmiths’ Centre and the Incorporation of Goldsmiths

 

Following the successful UK film premiere in March at the Goldsmiths’ Centre there is now another chance to catch this incredibly moving film and this time you can join us from wherever you are.

Date   Wed 24 June 2020
Time   6:00pm-8:00pm
Price   £5
Venue Online – via Zoom

BOOK NOW

The film reveals that glittering gold has a dark shadow, taking an unflinching look at how the world’s favourite precious metal is extracted from the earth. It explores both the big-time mining companies that dig deep and lop off mountaintops to extract gold from low-grade ore, and the small-time miners – an estimated 20 million people in the world’s poorest nations – who extract gold by hand, often producing just enough to survive.

 

 

But it doesn’t leave it there: we meet engineers, scientists, and Fair-Trade advocates who work with miners to tackle gold’s worst environmental and social problems. In an industrial-scale mine, we see new technology replacing cyanide-based processing with a biological process that leaves no toxic waste. We watch small-scale miners benefit from an environmentally friendly processes that replaces mercury and actually produces more gold. We meet Fair Trade jewellers who have created their own self-managed, transparent supply chain that ensures consumers know exactly where their gold comes from.

The film screening will be followed by a showing of the original panel discussion with the film producer Sally Blake, Duncan Marshall of Betts Metals and Rachel Brass of Levin Sources chaired by our very own Anna Loucah[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]