The Hidden Cost of Jewelry

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523290770768{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”231″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1523288751264{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][vc_column_text el_class=”caption” css=”.vc_custom_1523289601342{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]A 15-year-old boy mixes mercury and ground gold ore at a processing site in Mbeya Region, Tanzania.

image © 2013 Justin Purefoy for Human Rights Watch.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]On 8th February 2018 Human Rights Watch reported on their findings about supply chain transparency in the jewellery industry.

 

The hard-hitting report pulls no punches about the harsh reality of life for many gold and gemstone miners or the fact that most jewellers have no idea where their materials come from or the conditions under which they were mined and sourced.

Human Rights Watch figures estimate that there are 40 million people working in artisanal small-scale mining for the gold and diamond industries and of those around one million are children.

 

We know that much of the gold we buy for jewellery is recycled but for newly mined gold, the vast majority of the workforce is working at artisanal level, many in subsistence conditions with few choices over their working environment. For most gold on the market there is absolutely no guarantee of abuse or exploitation-free provenance.

 

The report focused on existing standards in relation to avoiding human rights abuses in the industry and the responses of the 13 jewellery companies HRW approached about due diligence in their supply chains. The report may have had a mixed reception but there’s no denying that the ongoing challenge to all of us in the industry is to look at our own supply chains and be bold in asking our suppliers about theirs.

 

You can read the full report at

https://www.hrw.org/report/2018/02/08/hidden-cost-jewelry/human-rights-supply-chains-and-responsibility-jewelry

 

and for more follow-up, with some very helpful information and comment, read the following on the Levin Sources Blog:

http://www.levinsources.com/blog/better-business-in-the-jewellery-sector-supply-chain-transparency

http://www.levinsources.com/blog/better-business-in-the-jewellery-sector-traceability

http://www.levinsources.com/blog/jewellery-industry-responsible-sourcing-human-rights-watch[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Fair Luxury Presents

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Fair Luxury Presents – September 2017″ font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1518551156795{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”78″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1519136490138{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Our first exhibition, Fair Luxury Presents at the Goldsmiths’ Centre, London, was a selling exhibition of jewellery celebrating responsible provenance as the third dimension of luxury, alongside design and craftsmanship. Marrying beauty and environmental awareness, we told the story of a piece of jewellery from the earth to the wearer – the materials, people and processes involved from source to beautifully crafted object.

Championing makers for whom traceability and sustainability are as important as craftsmanship and design, this exhibition was the first of its kind, a tangible expression of Fair Luxury.

Alongside the jewellery, photographs by renowned Magnum photographer Ian Berry captured the intricacies of worlds at different ends of the supply chain. He has recorded ordinary lives in extraordinary circumstances from 1960 onwards and here his prestigious lens turns to Fairtrade gold. Ian’s creativity and aesthetic draws a sharp contrast, creating beautiful images of the harsh reality of the artisanal mining sector and finishing with photographs of UK jewellers at the bench – to raise the profile of the need for sustainable and responsibly sourced gold.

Thanks to the Goldsmiths’ Centre, Janice Hosegood, Joanna Hardy and the Fair Luxury Team we are proud we made this happen[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Flux-Mini at IJL 2017

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Flux-Mini at IJL 2017″ font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523124277004{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”216″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1523124832690{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]

At IJL 2017, the major annual UK jewellery trade event (http://www.jewellerylondon.com), Fair Luxury presented the first ‘Flux-Mini’ – a soundbite from the acclaimed Flux Conferences and a great starting point for anyone begining to think about ethics and jewellery.  This condensed version of the conference gives delegates a topline insight into the issues facing the jewellery industry from mine to market in a future that’s dominated by ‘Aspirationals’ – a new breed of consumer that represents over 47% of the global population and who chooses to shop with brands that contribute positively to society.

The Flux-Mini programme at IJL:

‘Ethical choices in jewellery sourcing – what to consider and where to start’
Stuart Pool – Nineteen 48
Estelle Levin Nally – Levin Sources

​Brand authenticity and the ethical consumer – who she is and how to talk to her
Sarah Greenaway – Mosami / PersonaMe

Ethical jewellery in action – 4 pioneering jewellers sharing their experiences
Arabel Lebrusan
Amanda Li-Hope
Harriet Kelsall
Anna Loucah

Look out for similar ‘mini’ events in future with varying content, tailored to the audience and venue.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]