Diamonds – the hot topic

Diamonds – the hot topic

Alongside our autumn Fair Luxury Open House events, a series of webinars and talks on the theme of diamonds and the ethical issues and challenges faced and created by the diamond industry have been taking place across the globe. These eye-opening and positive events shine a light on what needs to change in the industry and offer possibilities for change.

kimberley process diamonds seminar

We all know that the lack of traceability in diamond supply chains is a huge issue. Knowing the origin and the path is the first step to know if diamonds are mined, cut, and processed with humanitarian and environmental considerations.
The webinar will explore how Blockchain and other emerging technologies can and are beginning to be used to help supply chains be traceable and accountable.

Other subjects addressed with open eyes and a realistic perspective to date include:  Human rights violations in the Kimberley Process, environmental destruction, the diamond industry viewed through the lens of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. The great thing is that alongside highlighting the problems are proposals for solutions and positive activities that have been implemented to date.

Thank you Chicago Responsible Jewelry Conference, Diamonds for Peace and others for creating a critical mass of content and to Human Rights Watch, The International Peace Information Service (IPIS), the Kimberley Process Civil Society Coalition and everyone who is bringing these important matters to the fore.

Fair Luxury at IJL 2018

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523290770768{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”488″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1538136134760{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][vc_column_text el_class=”caption” css=”.vc_custom_1535621439956{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Fair Luxury brought The Human Face of the Jewellery Supply Chain to IJL on Tuesday, 4th September 2018.

The seminar took place over three sessions at the Retail Theatre with an open-eyed yet positive look at situations and initiatives that are impacting the lives of people in our industry.

10.00 – 10.30am
The Hidden Cost of Jewellery – Human rights in the supply chain and how to source responsibly, Komala Ramachandra (Human Rights Watch)

Human Rights Watch highlights the human issues in the jewellery manufacturing sector, covered in detail in their report the Hidden Cost of Jewellery.

10.45 – 11.15am
Successes, challenges and progress on human rights in the artisanal mining sector, Victoria Gronwald, (Levin Sources Limited)

In this session Victoria highlights the extreme working conditions and human risks of artisanal mining and discusses progress and challenges on the journey towards integrating this important sector into global regulated supply chains.

11.30am – 12.00pm
Social impact models – Her Future Coalition – sourcing from a social enterprise for women jewellers in disadvantaged communities in India, Sarah Greenaway (Mosami)

Exploring impact innovation in the manufacturing sector, Sarah shares case studies of Her Future Coalition and other social enterprises that are changing lives, showing how positive impact can be made by re-imagining the supply chain.

For the IJL website click here and for our facebook event page here

You can access some of the presentations here

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The Hidden Cost of Jewelry

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523290770768{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”231″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1523288751264{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][vc_column_text el_class=”caption” css=”.vc_custom_1523289601342{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]A 15-year-old boy mixes mercury and ground gold ore at a processing site in Mbeya Region, Tanzania.

image © 2013 Justin Purefoy for Human Rights Watch.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]On 8th February 2018 Human Rights Watch reported on their findings about supply chain transparency in the jewellery industry.

 

The hard-hitting report pulls no punches about the harsh reality of life for many gold and gemstone miners or the fact that most jewellers have no idea where their materials come from or the conditions under which they were mined and sourced.

Human Rights Watch figures estimate that there are 40 million people working in artisanal small-scale mining for the gold and diamond industries and of those around one million are children.

 

We know that much of the gold we buy for jewellery is recycled but for newly mined gold, the vast majority of the workforce is working at artisanal level, many in subsistence conditions with few choices over their working environment. For most gold on the market there is absolutely no guarantee of abuse or exploitation-free provenance.

 

The report focused on existing standards in relation to avoiding human rights abuses in the industry and the responses of the 13 jewellery companies HRW approached about due diligence in their supply chains. The report may have had a mixed reception but there’s no denying that the ongoing challenge to all of us in the industry is to look at our own supply chains and be bold in asking our suppliers about theirs.

 

You can read the full report at

https://www.hrw.org/report/2018/02/08/hidden-cost-jewelry/human-rights-supply-chains-and-responsibility-jewelry

 

and for more follow-up, with some very helpful information and comment, read the following on the Levin Sources Blog:

http://www.levinsources.com/blog/better-business-in-the-jewellery-sector-supply-chain-transparency

http://www.levinsources.com/blog/better-business-in-the-jewellery-sector-traceability

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