The Fair Luxury Pledge

Open House January 2020

For many, a new year is a clean slate; an opportunity to hatch plans and establish goals.

If you foresee 2021 as the year your business takes on a more sustainable form, you might wish to kickstart it with the Fair Luxury Pledge.

Our Pledge is a new framework designed to support you and your peers, helping you to set your intentions for a responsible business in 2021 and be accountable to your community. Pledge-themed Open House events will now run quarterly, starting this month.

Will you join the movement?

To find out how to make YOUR Pledge, “come along” to our January Open House event.

The (virtual) doors will open on Thursday 28th January at 10am (London time) / 11am (Paris time).
Open House is free to attend, but please register in advance to join us.

We know that when jewellery is produced responsibly it can provide sustainable livelihoods for all involved – from the miners of raw materials right through the supply chain to the ultimate designer or retailer of the finished piece.

As individual designers, makers, traders and educators we’ve pledged to make changes and business decisions that are driven by more than just profit. In every aspect of our work, we seek to ensure that we are achieving and maintaining a safe, sustainable and just industry for all.

We are each at a different stage in our journey towards responsible business, but we are all working on it. No matter how big or small, our collective actions will change the world.
 

Through the jewellery we create and the ways we run our businesses, those who make the Fair Luxury Pledge each promise to:

1. Conserve and restore the environment

2. Work in a way that is responsible, transparent and accountable

3. Play a role in educating and empowering others

This session will last for one 1 hour, details below:

– 15 min: Short introduction to the Fair Luxury Pledge by Anna Loucah, founder of Anna Loucah fine jewellery. Members of the Fair Luxury team will share their pledges to get participants thinking about what their own pledge might be.

– 30 min: We will go into break out rooms to enable small group conversations.
What might your pledge be? It might be something as simple as using only eco cleaning products to wash your workshop floor! Or something bigger like only using gems with a guarentee of provenance. Use the conversation to brainstorm ideas and encourage each other.

– 15 min: We will re-join the main group and each group will share some of their thoughts/ possible intentions for the pledge.

After the event you will be encouraged to fill in our Pledge form.

The aim of the Pledge is to enable you to set realistic goals for yourself and your business, breaking them down into manageable steps.

It’s not necessarily about completion, it’s more about being accountable aswell as acknowledging and celebrating progress!

We’ll follow up at the next Pledge Open House with a chance to reflect on our progress and any challenges encountered along the way. It will take place on April 29th at 10am GMT

To find out how to make YOUR Pledge come along to the Open House or sign up to our mailing list for further updates.

Building an Ethical Jewellery Industry

Our first guest author is Kassandra Lauren Gordon, jeweller, poet and activist.

The Fair Luxury website states: “Each of us is at a different place on our journey to responsible business, but we are working on it. No matter how small, collectively our actions will transform our industry for the better.”

I couldn’t agree more.

I have always seen myself as an ethical jeweller and have tried my best to live up to that in my jewellery practice by giving clients the option to buy ethical materials. I have used fair trade gold, recycled gold, recycled silver and buy the most ethical gemstones I can find as much as possible.

But ultimately I can’t offer ethically sourced materials that I can’t find or that are too expensive for my customers. And if these materials are going to be more than branding for me they have to be as ethically sourced as they are claimed to be or we can’t rely on the effects of using ethical suppliers to materialise. However, I have no realistic way of verifying the claims to ‘ethicalness’ that a supplier makes, so I must take it on trust.

It’s just not possible to be ‘ethical’ in the sense of what we want this word to mean without the industry, or at least part of it, also being as ethical as we want to be.

I think one of the best vehicles for spreading the impact of the use of ethical supplies is combining our buying power and signposting to others which suppliers we believe are providing the best quality and ethically reliable supplies. As our influence grows and consumer tastes become more ethical, more suppliers would have the incentive to also start selling ethical supplies.

I am very inspired by the changes we’ve seen in the food industry. It was not long ago that to be vegetarian almost meant to not be able to eat at all if you were out. Perhaps there would be one token vegetarian option on the menu. But the industry has responded very robustly to the change in consumer tastes. Now some vegetarian substitutes are indistinguishable from traditional recipes because of the work that has been done on recipes and ingredients. Today, diners of a variety of diets have real options.

If we can build a network or a directory of ethical product and service providers, this could be a very good step in the direction of us being able to be the ethical jewellers we want to be ourselves and then expanding that impact through the industry.

To truly be ethical jewellers we must see our values manifested in the work of others.

Kassandra Lauren Gordon
September 2020

Fashion Gets Active!

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523290770768{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”568″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1599068151080{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][vc_column_text el_class=”caption” css=”.vc_custom_1599067770933{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]Gold Spiral Earrings   Ute Decker[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Those of us with long standing commitment to ethical sourcing have been working towards creating greater public awareness of the somewhat murkier challenges faced by the jewellery industry for some time now. It is often a difficult message to convey to an audience previously unaware that such issues exist and a tricky subject to broach with those only wishing to feel joy and hope for their own future with the purchase of that special ring.

 

How can something so representative of love be tainted by the struggles of those in the supply chain that created it?

 

Fifteen years ago, Hollywood focused public attention on the atrocities committed in the sourcing of what had become known as a ‘Blood Diamond’ with its release of a film of that name. However, since then wider public awareness has somewhat plateaued. Have we simply assumed that because there has been a film about it the issues highlighted have somehow been resolved?

 

We in the privileged western world are continuing to realise the power we hold as consumers but that can be overwhelming. Can we find ourselves dampened by a feeling of eco overload when everything that we choose to spend our money on seems to have some negative impact on our precious planet somewhere down the line?

 

Independent jewellers have long been conscientiously sharing their own best practice with their individual client bases and the number of such jewellers committed to ethical practice has grown exponentially over recent years – but it has still been a story that’s fermenting rather than exploding. Reaching a wider audience takes a louder voice.

 

And so, to see an entire feature in September’s edition of British Vogue dedicated to ethical sourcing and transparency in the supply chain does feel like a pretty substantial bump up the ladder.

 

The global fashion behemoth has again put itself one step ahead of what its readership wants before they knew they want it and dedicated a glossy 4-page spread – dripping with gorgeous jewels – to discuss, in user friendly terms, the complexities of today’s jewellery industry.

 

In an edition dedicated entirely to defining what modern activism looks like, Vogue UK’s Jewellery and Watch Director Rachel Garrahan digs into the many challenges facing the jewellery industry supply chain but also celebrates its many achievements.

 

‘Now more than ever, jewellers are committing to responsible sourcing via supply chains as lucid as the gems themselves’ she writes. ‘In a global jewellery industry estimated to be worth £230 billion, there is a growing demand among consumers to be able to make ethically sound choices’

 

The article features sound bites from numerous long committed jewellers alongside a dazzling display of the precious creations themselves – such as those of Fair Luxury friend and co-conspirator Ute Decker. In addition to the glossy images it is also pleasing to see a number of the development initiatives and supply chain trailblazers gain recognition – including our very own, ever glamorous and fashion forward Stuart Pool of Nineteen48!

 

In the long game towards creating a more transparent and responsible business practice this is an encouraging indication of what can be achieved with greater consumer awareness. The continued commitment of those working in all sectors of our industry combined with our shared collaborative passion means that we can enjoy, with growing confidence, a sense that we are moving towards something that can sincerely be defined as Fair Luxury.

 

Anna Loucah, September 2020

 

 

 

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Making Change

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523290663194{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”697″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” onclick=”custom_link” css=”.vc_custom_1583601941208{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}” link=”https://www.fairluxury.co.uk/featured/ethicalmakingresource/”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Make change by changing the way you make.

POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE – we’ll update you as soon as new details are announced.

 

The Incorporation of Goldsmiths 4th Ethical Making Symposium, Change Making will focus on how, through innovative design strategies and alternative sourcing methods, jewellers and makers can design out waste, source ethically and create better brands to make for change.

 

Innovative and thoughtful design and material choice are the cornerstones of ethical making and making to create positive change. Design is where new ideas are born, with the potential to disrupt damaging patterns and enact real change. Material choice can account for up to 95% of a product’s social and environmental impact. Choosing materials that are responsibly sourced, that reduce waste and promote social welfare is critical in the process of making for change. Combining this with innovative design transforms how and why we make, creating a better future of making.

The 2020 Change Making Symposium is open to students, makers and industry professionals and will be hosted by the Glasgow School of Art (GSA) in partnership with GSA Sustainability. The symposium talks will address Scotland’s design culture and legacy of ethical making, what sustainable materials are and how they can make positive change, and circular economy design principles.

Tickets can be purchased once the new date is announced.

Speakers and suppliers will include:

  • Dr Stacey Hunter, Design Curator and Producer
  • Kira Kampmann, Marc’Harit Pearls
  • Mary Michel, Ostrero, Circular Economy Research
  • Maira Toledo Rodrigues, Gemstones Brazil
  • Stuart Pool, Nineteen48 Gemstones
  • Betts Metals
  • Fairtrade
  • Fairmined

And more to be announced!

After a morning of engaging talks from makers, suppliers and researchers, there will be an ethical supplier fair in the afternoon for attendees to talk to suppliers and learn more about ethically sourced materials, followed by a drinks reception.

We will then be screening The Shadow of Gold, a new documentary examining the global gold trade, the second screening as part of the film’s UK premiere followed by a Q&A session.

 

Attendees may also register for a workshop in the afternoon (tickets are first come first serve and sold separately).
Scotland-based maker Jo Pudelko will be leading a practical jewellery workshop in which attendees will be reconstructing pre-owned jewellery into new pieces.

 

The Incorporation of Goldsmiths is committed to helping makers on their journey towards ethical making and do this through their annual Symposiums, a range of grants, the Ethical Making Resource and the Ethical Making Pledge with the Scottish Art Colleges. The Ethical Making Resource has been created by the Incorporation of Goldsmiths of the City of Edinburgh, which trades as the Edinburgh Assay Office, and is Scotland’s oldest consumer protection group. They have hundreds of years of experience in third-party, independent assessment and are now applying that experience to one of the most important issues in the industry today: making ethically and sustainably in a global world.

 

For more updates on the symposium and the Incorporation of Goldsmiths, follow @incorporationofgoldsmiths on Instagram and subscribe to their newsletter at www.incorporationofgoldsmiths.org. Head to www.ethicalmaking.org to learn more about the Ethical Making Resource.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Fashion Revolution

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1526566852539{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][rev_slider alias=”whomadeyourjewellery”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]This Fashion Revolution Week, April 22 to 28 2019, we want jewellery lovers to start asking their favourite jewellery brands ‘who made my jewellery?’ and ‘who mined my gold?’

 

We’re campaigning to bring more transparency to the jewellery industry and spotlight jewellers who are already making impact so it’s a great opportunity to highlight your own responsible practice and let others know what you are doing.

 

Everyone in the jewellery supply chain, from designer makers and brands to stone cutters, manufacturers and miners is invited to join in – here’s how:

Ask the people in your supply chain to take a selfie with the campaign’s ‘I made your jewellery’ banner. You can download it in pdf form here

Post your images on social media during Fashion Revolution Week and beyond, using the hashtags

#whomademyjewellery
#whomadeyourjewellery
#whominedyourgold
#imadeyourjewellery
#iminedyourgold
#iminedyourgemstone
#fashionrevolution

Tag us at @fairluxuk so we can share your posts and amplify the message. @fairtrade and @fairmined are getting behind our campaign too so tag them and @fash_rev too.

Ask your clients and friends to get involved and share the message too by asking “who made my jewellery?” (click here to download “who made my jewellery”)
Encourage them and your suppliers to post on social media too – and don’t forget to respond!

 

The Fashion Revolution movement has raised awareness of the challenges in fashion manufacturing and caused people to question brands on where and how clothing is made. We want people to think the same way about the story and people behind their jewellery and asking where their gold and gemstones came from. Find out more about Fashion Revolution and download campaign resources and artwork at fashionrevolution.org

 

Let’s get together and make some noise for the jewellery world this Fashion Revolution Week[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Perspectives Exhibition

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1526566852539{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][rev_slider alias=”perspectives-at-elements”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Edinburgh’s annual jewellery event, the Elements Festival, takes place this weekend from 19th to 21st October and we’re delighted to have co-curated the festival exhibition with the Incorporation of Goldsmiths.

Entitled Perspectives – Creating Jewellery for a Fairer Future, the exhibition features work from more than 30 makers, from high-end to high-street, from avant-garde to classic design. Take a journey with us and discover some amazing pieces while exploring the broad range of ethical choices and considerations for jewellery buyers and makers.

Exhibitors include Ute Decker, Wright & Teague, Made, Dorothy Hogg and the Fair Luxury team.

Ths is a must-visit event for all jewellery lovers!

19th – 21st October
11am to 6pm
Lyon & Turnbull
Broughton Place
Edinburgh EH1 3RR

For more about the events and full details visit the Elements Festival website

 

images:
Sandra Wilson – Purest Green Bowl / Amanda Li Hope – Commission in progress /
Arabel Lebrusan – Victoriana bangle / Cox & Power – Arena Ring
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Fair Luxury at the RCA

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Fair Luxury at the RCA” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1526915320210{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}” link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.eventbrite.co.uk%2Fe%2Ffair-luxury-at-the-rca-tickets-45681422364|title:book%20now|target:%20_blank|”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”381″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1527344940584{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]At Fair Luxury at the RCA 2018 we heard about and discussed some of the opportunities, issues and challenges around ethical sourcing.

The day included presentations from some of the key figures in the field of responsible sourcing and practice with some fresh approaches and new names including practising jewellers, representatives of certification programmes, gem traders, consultants and researchers working on artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM). If you want to be the first to know about future events please sign up to our mailing list.

 

DATE AND TIME

Wednesday 11th July 2018, 9:30 – 17:30

 

LOCATION

Royal College of Art
Jay Mews Entrance, Darwin Building
Kensington Gore
London
SW7 2EU

 

Subjects and speakers will include:

The Fairmined Certification Programme
Yves Bertan and Kenneth Porter from the Alliance for Responsible Mining (ARM)

Mining in Sri Lanka
Stuart Pool (Nineteen 48 Gemstones)

Being a Licensee Jeweller: Ideals and Practicalities
Susi Smither (The Rock Hound), Tim Ingle (Ingle & Rhode), Naqiyah Sultan (Kashka), Peter Crump (Vipa Designs)

“Make It Happen” with Fairmined Gold
Martin Taber (Ethical Metalsmiths)

The Ethical Making Resource
Mary Michel and Emily Macdonald (Incorporation of Goldsmiths)

Diamond Supply Chains
Gavin Hilson (University of Surrey)

Discussion and Wrap-up event, drawing on the days themes
Estelle Levin-Nally (Levin Sources)

Click here for event details and directions

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Flux-Mini at IJL 2017

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Flux-Mini at IJL 2017″ font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523124277004{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”216″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1523124832690{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]

At IJL 2017, the major annual UK jewellery trade event (http://www.jewellerylondon.com), Fair Luxury presented the first ‘Flux-Mini’ – a soundbite from the acclaimed Flux Conferences and a great starting point for anyone begining to think about ethics and jewellery.  This condensed version of the conference gives delegates a topline insight into the issues facing the jewellery industry from mine to market in a future that’s dominated by ‘Aspirationals’ – a new breed of consumer that represents over 47% of the global population and who chooses to shop with brands that contribute positively to society.

The Flux-Mini programme at IJL:

‘Ethical choices in jewellery sourcing – what to consider and where to start’
Stuart Pool – Nineteen 48
Estelle Levin Nally – Levin Sources

​Brand authenticity and the ethical consumer – who she is and how to talk to her
Sarah Greenaway – Mosami / PersonaMe

Ethical jewellery in action – 4 pioneering jewellers sharing their experiences
Arabel Lebrusan
Amanda Li-Hope
Harriet Kelsall
Anna Loucah

Look out for similar ‘mini’ events in future with varying content, tailored to the audience and venue.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]