Making Impact Conference

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]“Thank you for the wonderful Fair Luxury Making Impact Conference”

“I had a really great day and left feeling inspired by all the amazing speakers and buzzing with energy!”

Just two responses to Making Impact – our 2019 conference with the Incorporation of Goldsmiths in Edinburgh which took place at Edinburgh College of Art on 3rd April.

A broad audience, including jewellers and silversmiths, gemstone dealers and mining experts, students and academics amongst others, explored how the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) relate to jewellery and metalwork practice in the UK and in our industry globally. More and more businesses are using the SDGs to help them prioritise and communicate areas for social, environmental and economic impact and we looked at how they can become a set of tools to enable us to make a positive impact in our field and in our practice.

 

Speakers and subject included:

Keynote speaker – Emily Auckland from the UK Stake Holders for Sustainable Development (UKSSD)
UKSSD is a cross-sector network of organisations who work together to drive action on the UN sustainable development goals in the UK. Emily introduced the SDGs and talked about how they can be used by individuals, organisations and globally to effect change.

Vivienne Low from Fashion Revolution Scotland reported on the ongoing Fashion Revolution campaign and highlighted ways in which we can question and change our outlook and lifestyle and join the campaign in order to improve the lives of others.

Simon Forrester introduced the National Association of Jewellers Better Business Pathway and talked about their other work and member resources.

Stuart Pool presented the GIA (Gemmological Institute of America) and PACT Tanzania Project, helping artisanal women miners in Tanzania build better livelihoods.

Dr Sandra Wilson – Urban Gold Rush: Recovering precious metals from electronic waste.

Hannah Bedford and Stefanie Cheong talked about Ethical Jewellery in Practice.

Jennifer Gray from Edinburgh College of Art and the Student Ambassadors brought updates on progress in the Scottish Art colleges following the signing of the Ethical Making Pledge and talked about new independent initiatives they are taking, plus exciting news about the proposed introduction of an ethics course which goes beyond the jewellery and silversmithing departments.
For more about the Ethical Making Programme click here 

You can see and download the full event programme here

Special thanks to the Incorporation of Goldsmiths and Edinburgh College of Art for working with us to host and create this inspiring and energising event.

If you would like to be kept informed of future events please sign up to our mailing list and we’ll let you know of our news and upcoming events[/vc_column_text][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1526566852539{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][rev_slider alias=”making-impact-2019″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Perspectives Exhibition

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1526566852539{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][rev_slider alias=”perspectives-at-elements”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Edinburgh’s annual jewellery event, the Elements Festival, takes place this weekend from 19th to 21st October and we’re delighted to have co-curated the festival exhibition with the Incorporation of Goldsmiths.

Entitled Perspectives – Creating Jewellery for a Fairer Future, the exhibition features work from more than 30 makers, from high-end to high-street, from avant-garde to classic design. Take a journey with us and discover some amazing pieces while exploring the broad range of ethical choices and considerations for jewellery buyers and makers.

Exhibitors include Ute Decker, Wright & Teague, Made, Dorothy Hogg and the Fair Luxury team.

Ths is a must-visit event for all jewellery lovers!

19th – 21st October
11am to 6pm
Lyon & Turnbull
Broughton Place
Edinburgh EH1 3RR

For more about the events and full details visit the Elements Festival website

 

images:
Sandra Wilson – Purest Green Bowl / Amanda Li Hope – Commission in progress /
Arabel Lebrusan – Victoriana bangle / Cox & Power – Arena Ring
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Diamonds For Peace

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523290770768{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”460″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1536530506610{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][vc_column_text el_class=”caption” css=”.vc_custom_1536530464518{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Diamonds for Peace was formed in Japan in 2014 as a direct result of founder Chie Murakami’s exploration of the diamond industry and supply chain when she became engaged and wanted to find out more about where diamonds come from.

Working at each end of the supply chain, Diamonds for Peace has a unique two-stranded approach, both raising public awareness about the challenges and realities of the diamond industry and also engaging on-the-ground with a mining project working to bring responsibly sourced diamonds to market.

For more about Diamonds for Peace and their work you can access and download their newsletter here.

You will also hear from some of the people in the artisanal mining community in Liberia where Diamonds for Peace is working to develop a better and safer working environment as well as a more equitable route to market.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Event Highlights to Download

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1526566852539{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][rev_slider alias=”rca2018″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Here you can access some of the presentations from our conferences and events
just click on the relevant link to download

Human Rights in the Supply Chain – Victoria Gronwald from Levin Sources, Fair Luxury at IJL 2018

People in the Supply Chain – Sarah Greenaway, Fair Luxury at IJL 2018

An Ethical Business – Harriet Kelsall, Flux 2016, Goldsmiths’ Centre[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Fair Luxury at IJL 2018

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523290770768{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”488″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1538136134760{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][vc_column_text el_class=”caption” css=”.vc_custom_1535621439956{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Fair Luxury brought The Human Face of the Jewellery Supply Chain to IJL on Tuesday, 4th September 2018.

The seminar took place over three sessions at the Retail Theatre with an open-eyed yet positive look at situations and initiatives that are impacting the lives of people in our industry.

10.00 – 10.30am
The Hidden Cost of Jewellery – Human rights in the supply chain and how to source responsibly, Komala Ramachandra (Human Rights Watch)

Human Rights Watch highlights the human issues in the jewellery manufacturing sector, covered in detail in their report the Hidden Cost of Jewellery.

10.45 – 11.15am
Successes, challenges and progress on human rights in the artisanal mining sector, Victoria Gronwald, (Levin Sources Limited)

In this session Victoria highlights the extreme working conditions and human risks of artisanal mining and discusses progress and challenges on the journey towards integrating this important sector into global regulated supply chains.

11.30am – 12.00pm
Social impact models – Her Future Coalition – sourcing from a social enterprise for women jewellers in disadvantaged communities in India, Sarah Greenaway (Mosami)

Exploring impact innovation in the manufacturing sector, Sarah shares case studies of Her Future Coalition and other social enterprises that are changing lives, showing how positive impact can be made by re-imagining the supply chain.

For the IJL website click here and for our facebook event page here

You can access some of the presentations here

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Make the #ProvenancePledge

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1526566852539{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][rev_slider alias=”provenancepledge” order=”39,40,41,42″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]We’d love you to be part of our growing community of ethically minded jewellers. Join our campaign and make a pledge to find out more about where your jewellery and materials come from and be part of a changing jewellery industry.

We launched the #ProvenancePledge during Fashion Revolution Week 2018 to encourage people to make a commitment to responsible sourcing, seek transparency in the supply chain and learn the provenance of materials. You can take the #ProvenancePledge as a very first step or to mark a new commitment in your ethical journey.

Your particular pledge will be unique to you – but will show that you have made a promise to be part of the change.

It may be a decision to start using certified precious metal or to making a percentage of your work from certified gold; asking all your suppliers where their material comes from and what they know about working conditions of those who produced it; telling your customers what you know about the materials you work with – and these are just for starters.

Share your pledge on your channels to demonstrate your commitment to Fair Luxury using the hashtags #FairLuxury  #ProvenancePledge and tag us @fairluxuk so we can be sure to find you and share your good news!

We’re here to help – just get in touch. Sign up to our mailing list and join our social media community to be the first to know about our news and events. You can also find lots of practical information about ethical jewellery practice at the new ethical making resource http://www.ethicalmaking.org/[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

It’s In Our Hands

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523290663194{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”226″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1523276294906{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]It’s In Our Hands, the second Ethical Making Symposium in Edinburgh on 28th March 2018 was a ground-breaking day marking two massive achievements

The Ethical Making Resource  www.ethicalmaking.org

The Ethical Making Pledge

The Ethical Making Resource is the new go-to website for pretty much everything you need to know about responsible and ethical practice, sustainability and sourcing in the world of jewellery and silversmithing. It is packed with information for anyone wanting to follow more ethical practices in their business.

The launch is the culmination of a labour of love for the team at the Incorporation of Goldsmiths, pioneers of ethical practice Ute Decker and Greg Valerio and fount of materials knowledge Dr Peter Oakley. As well as being a marvellous resource we like to think it also celebrates the spirit of collaboration and openness that makes this movement special.

As if this were not significant enough, the day was preceded with a press call to witness the signing of the Ethical Making Pledge by each of the Scottish Art Colleges running jewellery and silversmithing courses at HND level and higher.

The Ethical Making Pledge is an initiative created by the Incorporation of Goldsmiths in collaboration with the Scottish art colleges with the purpose of embedding ethical making practices into higher education in Scotland. The colleges have committed to move towards the use of ethically sourced precious metals in their workshops; include ethical theory and practice in their curriculums and in workshop practices and to nominate student ambassadors to take part in ethical making information sessions organised and led by the Incorporation.

And all this before the symposium got underway!

From Greg Valerio’s passionate and inspiring keynote introduction to the closing words, the event was packed with useful information on ethical making from a broad range of speakers – including our own Jane Barnett – alongside real-life experience from makers at different stages of their journeys in responsible practice.

The day was a resounding success, clearly demonstrated by the lively and animated conversations during the open networking session that concluded the proceedings.

Massive congratulations and appreciation to Mary Michel at the Incorporation of Goldsmiths whose passion and drive has made all of this happen, along with Emily Macdonald and the team.

For more about the amazing work going on in Scotland go to the Incorporation of Goldsmiths site at
http://www.incorporationofgoldsmiths.org/

For the ethical making resource
www.ethicalmaking.org[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

The Hidden Cost of Jewelry

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523290770768{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”231″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1523288751264{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][vc_column_text el_class=”caption” css=”.vc_custom_1523289601342{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]A 15-year-old boy mixes mercury and ground gold ore at a processing site in Mbeya Region, Tanzania.

image © 2013 Justin Purefoy for Human Rights Watch.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]On 8th February 2018 Human Rights Watch reported on their findings about supply chain transparency in the jewellery industry.

 

The hard-hitting report pulls no punches about the harsh reality of life for many gold and gemstone miners or the fact that most jewellers have no idea where their materials come from or the conditions under which they were mined and sourced.

Human Rights Watch figures estimate that there are 40 million people working in artisanal small-scale mining for the gold and diamond industries and of those around one million are children.

 

We know that much of the gold we buy for jewellery is recycled but for newly mined gold, the vast majority of the workforce is working at artisanal level, many in subsistence conditions with few choices over their working environment. For most gold on the market there is absolutely no guarantee of abuse or exploitation-free provenance.

 

The report focused on existing standards in relation to avoiding human rights abuses in the industry and the responses of the 13 jewellery companies HRW approached about due diligence in their supply chains. The report may have had a mixed reception but there’s no denying that the ongoing challenge to all of us in the industry is to look at our own supply chains and be bold in asking our suppliers about theirs.

 

You can read the full report at

https://www.hrw.org/report/2018/02/08/hidden-cost-jewelry/human-rights-supply-chains-and-responsibility-jewelry

 

and for more follow-up, with some very helpful information and comment, read the following on the Levin Sources Blog:

http://www.levinsources.com/blog/better-business-in-the-jewellery-sector-supply-chain-transparency

http://www.levinsources.com/blog/better-business-in-the-jewellery-sector-traceability

http://www.levinsources.com/blog/jewellery-industry-responsible-sourcing-human-rights-watch[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Fair Luxury Presents

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Fair Luxury Presents – September 2017″ font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1518551156795{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”78″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1519136490138{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Our first exhibition, Fair Luxury Presents at the Goldsmiths’ Centre, London, was a selling exhibition of jewellery celebrating responsible provenance as the third dimension of luxury, alongside design and craftsmanship. Marrying beauty and environmental awareness, we told the story of a piece of jewellery from the earth to the wearer – the materials, people and processes involved from source to beautifully crafted object.

Championing makers for whom traceability and sustainability are as important as craftsmanship and design, this exhibition was the first of its kind, a tangible expression of Fair Luxury.

Alongside the jewellery, photographs by renowned Magnum photographer Ian Berry captured the intricacies of worlds at different ends of the supply chain. He has recorded ordinary lives in extraordinary circumstances from 1960 onwards and here his prestigious lens turns to Fairtrade gold. Ian’s creativity and aesthetic draws a sharp contrast, creating beautiful images of the harsh reality of the artisanal mining sector and finishing with photographs of UK jewellers at the bench – to raise the profile of the need for sustainable and responsibly sourced gold.

Thanks to the Goldsmiths’ Centre, Janice Hosegood, Joanna Hardy and the Fair Luxury Team we are proud we made this happen[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Flux-Mini at IJL 2017

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Flux-Mini at IJL 2017″ font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523124277004{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”216″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1523124832690{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]

At IJL 2017, the major annual UK jewellery trade event (http://www.jewellerylondon.com), Fair Luxury presented the first ‘Flux-Mini’ – a soundbite from the acclaimed Flux Conferences and a great starting point for anyone begining to think about ethics and jewellery.  This condensed version of the conference gives delegates a topline insight into the issues facing the jewellery industry from mine to market in a future that’s dominated by ‘Aspirationals’ – a new breed of consumer that represents over 47% of the global population and who chooses to shop with brands that contribute positively to society.

The Flux-Mini programme at IJL:

‘Ethical choices in jewellery sourcing – what to consider and where to start’
Stuart Pool – Nineteen 48
Estelle Levin Nally – Levin Sources

​Brand authenticity and the ethical consumer – who she is and how to talk to her
Sarah Greenaway – Mosami / PersonaMe

Ethical jewellery in action – 4 pioneering jewellers sharing their experiences
Arabel Lebrusan
Amanda Li-Hope
Harriet Kelsall
Anna Loucah

Look out for similar ‘mini’ events in future with varying content, tailored to the audience and venue.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]