Open House – April 2021

Open House – April 2021

April Open House: The Fair Luxury Pledge – learn more and share progress.

Thursday 29 April (BST) online via Zoom

At the time of writing almost 100 members of the jewellery industry have signed up to the Fair Luxury Pledge since January – committing to make positive changes to their business.

We’re over the moon to report this and now invite you to our second Pledge-themed Open House get-together, a chance to reflect on progress so far, trade ideas and acknowledge any challenges faced along the way.

If you have not yet made the Pledge but are interested in learning more please join us – when it comes to embarking on a journey towards responsible business, there’s no time like the present!

No matter where you’re at on your ethical jewellery journey, the Pledge exists to enable us to set realistic goals for ourselves and our businesses, breaking them down into manageable steps. It’s not necessarily about completion, but being accountable and celebrating progress.

The event is free to attend but please register in advance to join us.

WE’LL BE HEARING FROM

Attendees will be split into breakout rooms based on the main Pledge categories and themes that our Pledgees have flagged up as useful topics for discussion. These rooms are an opportunity to engage in organic chat with others about your challenges and learnings. When you register for the event you’ll have the chance to choose which room you’d like to join,

BREAKOUT ROOM CATEGORIES:

1. Metal Sourcing (Recycled, Fairmined, Fairtrade etc)

2. Responsibly Sourced Gems & Diamonds

3. Sustainable Packaging

4. Educating/Communicating with Customers

5. Working Sustainably
: General learning, strategy, understanding your business’s impact

6. New Pledges: For those yet to make a Pledge and wishing to learn more

About Open House

The Fair Luxury Open Housse sessions are an opportunity to get together with the jewellery community, get inspired and find support on your fair jewellery journey.

Established designers, makers, new graduates and independent businesses – whatever stage of the ethical sourcing journey you’re at, you are very welcome.

Join Fair Luxury Open House on Zoom to learn and exchange on all things relating to ethical jewellery. By nurturing a sense of human connection and sharing information we can support each other and help to focus our individual intentions.

Trends & The New Digital Normal in a Post-COVID World

Trends & The New Digital Normal in a Post-COVID World

Our March Open House: An energising and inspiring panel discussion on design and consumer trends in 2021 and beyond.

Thursday 11 March 15:00-16:30 (GMT) online

2020 was a year like no other and has understandably left many of us feeling uncertain about what lies ahead for the jewellery industry. With this month’s Open House we hope to shed some light on what we might expect from an inexorably changed marketplace and analyse how to effectively communicate your brand’s message in a virtual world.

In what promises to be an informative session with lots of practical advice, we call on industry experts to share their visions of the ‘new normal’ and the changes that will come to define a post-pandemic world.

Fair Luxury is delighted to invite you to this dynamic session of both expert opinion and Q&A.

The event is free to attend but please register in advance to join us.

SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKERS

Belinda Morris: Industry journalist and editor of The Jeweller magazine for the National Association of Jewellers, on the importance of the written word in connecting with e-commerce savvy clients.

Maia Adams: Jewellery expert and co-founder of global trend forecasting company ‘Adorn Insight’, on what we might expect in terms of ‘consumer priority’ for the year ahead.

Kate Baxter: Founder and Creative Director of The Cut London, a bespoke engagement ring concierge and curated online showcase, on how to create a luxury experience via on-line consultation.

About Open House

The Fair Luxury Open Housse sessions are an opportunity to get together with the jewellery community, get inspired and find support on your fair jewellery journey.

Established designers, makers, new graduates and independent businesses – whatever stage of the ethical sourcing journey you’re at, you are very welcome.

Join Fair Luxury Open House on Zoom to learn and exchange on all things relating to ethical jewellery. By nurturing a sense of human connection and sharing information we can support each other and help to focus our individual intentions.

Impacts of COVID-19 on ASM

Impacts of COVID-19 on ASM

The COVID-19 pandemic has had significant detrimental impacts on the artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) sector worldwide. It has caused supply chain disruptions that have impacted large – and small-scale mineral sectors alike, and has resulted in a drop in both production and income for huge numbers of artisanal miners, many of whom do not have the capital to be resilient against such shocks.

Against this backdrop, and knowing the importance of reliable data for understanding the challenges that faced artisanal miners, Levin Sources participated in a study looking at the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM). As part of the World Bank-funded Delve Impact Reporting Initiative, we conducted interviews from May – July 2020 with both artisanal miners and key sector stakeholders in the DRC, Mozambique, Uganda and Zimbabwe. With a focus on gold and construction minerals, data was collected from miners every two weeks over a ten-week period, in order to understand how the impacts of the pandemic were changing for miners over time. Approximately thirty to forty mine site respondents were interviewed by telephone in each country, using a remote survey designed by Delve. Data was collected on a number of key topics, including health and safety (related to COVID-19), gender issues, physical security, food security, government support and engagement and how miner’s production, markets and supply chains were impacted by the pandemic and related restrictions.

Our key findings have been documented in a series of blogs, showcasing our results in each country, as well as a special edition on the gendered impacts of COVID – how the pandemic has impacted women artisanal miners in particular.

View the blogs created by Levin Sources staff and our in country associates.

https://www.levinsources.com/knowledge-centre/insights/asm-covid-19-government-response

https://www.levinsources.com/knowledge-centre/insights/impacts-covid-19-asm-mozambique

https://www.levinsources.com/knowledge-centre/insights/covid-19-impacts-artisanal-gold-mining-zimbabwe

https://www.levinsources.com/knowledge-centre/insights/covid-19-communaut%C3%A9s-mineurs-artisanaux-rdc

https://www.levinsources.com/knowledge-centre/insights/impacts-covid-19-women-asm

https://www.levinsources.com/knowledge-centre/insights/covid-19-impacts-asm-uganda-policy-recommendations

Jane Barnett, December 2020

Is your jewellery brand really responsible?

Ethical jewellery. Fair trade products.  Responsible brands. Sustainable business. All sounds good, right?

Over the last few years there has been an explosion in the number of brands promoting themselves as all of these things.

Maybe your brand is one of them.  Maybe you feel passionately about doing the right thing and have taken steps to do something positive in your business.

But are you truly creating a responsible business?

When thinking about impact or sustainability, most brands focus inwards – analysing the inner workings of their business model.  Where do my materials come from?  How are my pieces manufactured?  What’s my carbon footprint?

These are great starting points (and ones we should all be tackling!), but they are just one piece of a much bigger puzzle.

Running a responsible business means going beyond just our main, day to day activities.  It requires us to think about our values, our business as a whole, our wider impact on the world, and our sphere of influence.

A recent blog by sustainability consultancy V&V, talks about the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and how they can help you build a more resilient business model.  Whilst, at first glance, some of the goals can feel pretty daunting, they all provide a starting point to explore innovative ways of working, empowering, and giving.

Here are five of the Goals brought to life with examples from brands already embracing them.  They aim to inspire you to develop a more outwardly focused strategy that will benefit your brand and the world around it.  Ideas for all 17 of the Goals can be downloaded from the V&V website.

Goal 1 No Poverty

This Goal asks us all to think about how we can reduce poverty. Brands like Yala Jewellery and SOKO Kenya have chosen to work directly with the people in their supply chains to empower them to improve their livelihoods. According to Yala, one of the workshops they work with ‘enables its artisans to look after themselves and their families, as well as neighbours and friends who are dependent on them. In total, their work has a positive impact on over 300 households in the area’.

If you aren’t able to work directly with producers, could you explore opportunities to work with NGOs that do? Both the Fairtrade certification scheme and the Fairmined standard for gold both aim to support people out of poverty.

Goal 5 – Gender Equality

One way you can support gender equality is to commit to the UN Women’s Empowerment Principals. These are 7 actions that advance and empower women in the workplace, marketplace and community.

Jewellery brand, Swarovski, have brought them to life through their work with BSR’s (Business for Social Responsibility) HERproject.  For example, one project trained women in their supply chain on health issues, and empowered them to share their knowledge with their peers.

You don’t have to employ hundreds of people to put equality on your brand’s agenda. Have a look at how Purpose Jewellery support women who have escaped human trafficking to ‘find hope, dignity and freedom for the future’.

Goal 8 – Decent Work and Economic Empowerment.

Here’s some inspiration for Goal 8:  Jewellery brand Little by Little’s business model goes way beyond just making jewellery. The team have established a charitable partnership with Luminary Bakeries. Every piece of Little by Little jewellery sold provides a disadvantaged woman with a career-boosting day of training at the bakery to help build employment skills and experience.

Your brand’s support for the goals doesn’t have to directly link to fashion and jewellery to be beneficial to all involved. Could your brand partner with other local businesses or groups to improve someone’s access to work?

Goal 12 – Responsible Consumption & Production

Choosing more sustainable materials, such as certified recycled or artisanal metals, is obviously crucial for this goal.  As is having a supplier code-of-conduct in place to ensure you are working with responsible manufacturers.   But what about the rest of your business?  Why not conduct a waste audit to see what you are wasting and why.  Then find ways to reduce, reuse & recycle.

Ellie Air Jewellery has found ways to produce better and consume less across their business: ensuring packaging is plastic-free and fully recyclable, minimising the use of hazardous chemicals in their workshop, making the business paperless where possible, and running their studio on renewable energy.  What small changes could you make?  Often making changes like this can create efficiencies in the way your work, resulting in cost savings.  Win-win.

Goal 14 – Life Below Water

Now this one sounds tricky, especially for a jewellery business!  But if you are passionate about protecting our oceans you can find a way to make a difference.

Have a look at how jewellery brand Alex Monroe supports Goal 14, through their Ocean’s Collection in partnership with Friends of the Earth.  This project raises money for a cause that the brand is passionate about and educates their customers on the issue of plastic waste in our oceans.  It’s also a great PR story for the brand.  Another win-win!

Focusing on just one of the goals does not make a sustainable business.  Thinking carefully about what you believe and where you can have the most positive impact across the goals will help you to build a strategy that can lead to a truly sustainable way of working.  Your starting point might still be to look at where your materials come from or how your pieces are made, but perhaps through the choices you make you can also contribute to reducing gender inequality, empowering others to find decent work, or even saving our oceans.

Victoria Waugh, October 2020

The Shadow of Gold

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading source=”post_title” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1523290663194{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”674″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” onclick=”custom_link” css=”.vc_custom_1580063169374{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}” link=”https://www.fairluxury.co.uk/featured/ethicalmakingresource/”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]

Join us for an online screening of

The Shadow of Gold

In partnership with
The Goldsmiths’ Centre and the Incorporation of Goldsmiths

 

Following the successful UK film premiere in March at the Goldsmiths’ Centre there is now another chance to catch this incredibly moving film and this time you can join us from wherever you are.

Date   Wed 24 June 2020
Time   6:00pm-8:00pm
Price   £5
Venue Online – via Zoom

BOOK NOW

The film reveals that glittering gold has a dark shadow, taking an unflinching look at how the world’s favourite precious metal is extracted from the earth. It explores both the big-time mining companies that dig deep and lop off mountaintops to extract gold from low-grade ore, and the small-time miners – an estimated 20 million people in the world’s poorest nations – who extract gold by hand, often producing just enough to survive.

 

 

But it doesn’t leave it there: we meet engineers, scientists, and Fair-Trade advocates who work with miners to tackle gold’s worst environmental and social problems. In an industrial-scale mine, we see new technology replacing cyanide-based processing with a biological process that leaves no toxic waste. We watch small-scale miners benefit from an environmentally friendly processes that replaces mercury and actually produces more gold. We meet Fair Trade jewellers who have created their own self-managed, transparent supply chain that ensures consumers know exactly where their gold comes from.

The film screening will be followed by a showing of the original panel discussion with the film producer Sally Blake, Duncan Marshall of Betts Metals and Rachel Brass of Levin Sources chaired by our very own Anna Loucah[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Fair Luxury at the RCA

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Fair Luxury at the RCA” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1526915320210{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}” link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.eventbrite.co.uk%2Fe%2Ffair-luxury-at-the-rca-tickets-45681422364|title:book%20now|target:%20_blank|”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”381″ img_size=”full” add_caption=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1527344940584{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]At Fair Luxury at the RCA 2018 we heard about and discussed some of the opportunities, issues and challenges around ethical sourcing.

The day included presentations from some of the key figures in the field of responsible sourcing and practice with some fresh approaches and new names including practising jewellers, representatives of certification programmes, gem traders, consultants and researchers working on artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM). If you want to be the first to know about future events please sign up to our mailing list.

 

DATE AND TIME

Wednesday 11th July 2018, 9:30 – 17:30

 

LOCATION

Royal College of Art
Jay Mews Entrance, Darwin Building
Kensington Gore
London
SW7 2EU

 

Subjects and speakers will include:

The Fairmined Certification Programme
Yves Bertan and Kenneth Porter from the Alliance for Responsible Mining (ARM)

Mining in Sri Lanka
Stuart Pool (Nineteen 48 Gemstones)

Being a Licensee Jeweller: Ideals and Practicalities
Susi Smither (The Rock Hound), Tim Ingle (Ingle & Rhode), Naqiyah Sultan (Kashka), Peter Crump (Vipa Designs)

“Make It Happen” with Fairmined Gold
Martin Taber (Ethical Metalsmiths)

The Ethical Making Resource
Mary Michel and Emily Macdonald (Incorporation of Goldsmiths)

Diamond Supply Chains
Gavin Hilson (University of Surrey)

Discussion and Wrap-up event, drawing on the days themes
Estelle Levin-Nally (Levin Sources)

Click here for event details and directions

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FLUX 2017

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”FLUX 2017 – Assay Office Birmingham
April 2017

” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1518550503013{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”74″ img_size=”full” css=”.vc_custom_1519069257435{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Wow – what an amazing two days we had at Flux 2017. For those who were there, thank you for your part in a truly inspiring event. If you couldn’t make it, the good news is there is plenty happening that you can be involved in – see below to find out more.

We travelled the globe exploring the vast arena of sourcing, ethics, responsible practice and sustainability in the jewellery trade, hearing from pioneers and others newer to the scene, including larger brands, about what they are doing, their challenges and achievements. We also connected with like-minded organisations in the UK and beyond and from international policy to grass-roots level – from NGO to individual jeweller – we heard about what is happening to effect change and what we can do, along with information about on-the-ground support and training.

Alongside this, inspirational case studies and motivational presentations from people who are really doing it and making things happen challenged us to put a different perspective on what we can each do to effect change if we care about the communities that source our materials and the impact our work has upon those around us.

Our very big thanks to our hosts, Assay Office Birmingham, and speakers, all passionate changemakers, who gave freely of their time and expertise, helping us question, challenge and facilitate progress, achievement and change.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

FLUX 2016

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”FLUX 2016 – Goldsmiths’ Centre
April 2016
” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” css=”.vc_custom_1519135857865{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row gap=”10″][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”73″ img_size=”full” css=”.vc_custom_1519136128479{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Tuesday 19th April saw the inaugural FLUX conference at the Goldsmiths’ Centre. A packed day of diverse keynote speakers and interactive workshop sessions began with Lina Villa, Executive Director of the Alliance for Responsible Mining in Columbia, responsible for the Fairmined initiative.

Lina shared her experiences of implementing change through increased standards in mining safety and the positive effect such essential work has had on the lives of the millions of artisanal miners across South America.

Next, Orsola de Castro – co founder of the global phenomenon that is ‘Fashion Revolution’. Conceived in the wake of the Rana Plaza disaster in which 1,130 Bangladeshi garment factory workers lost their lives, Orsola shared her inspirational journey of just what is involved in flying the flag for sustainability amidst today’s seemingly insatiable desire for fast fashion.

Jack Cunningham, Group Sustainability Manager at Gemfields PLC rounded off the keynote speakers with a frank and honest discussion of the challenges faced in gemstone mining and marketing when acting as the model for ethical policy within an industry that has an inherently chequered history of environmental practice.

Woven between these fascinating topics were workshop sessions held by such industry specialists as campaigner, Greg Valerio MBE, responsible sourcing specialist Estelle Levin and CMJ Chief Executive, Willie Hamilton.

The day’s proceedings were brought to a buoyant close by Antiques Roadshow jewellery expert Joanna Hardy who shared a light hearted presentation on her recent experiences whilst searching for rubies in Myanmar.

This ticketed event sold out soon after launch proving the undoubted hunger for such debate within the jewellery supply chain.

‘The UK really is leading the way in ethical practice within our industry” commented key note speaker Lina Villa. ‘It is always inspiring to come here and see the enthusiasm you have to make real change.’

The overall sense of the day was one of hope and conviction. Delegates and speakers alike shared experiences and knowledge across a broad spectrum of topics – all united by the common belief that advancement is possible and by continuing to communicate and work together we can all play a part in effecting real change.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]